Rosa Luxemburg

AUDIO: The Rosa Luxemburg collection

Submitted by cathy n on Mon, 08/04/2019 - 15:53
Rosa Luxemburg audio

Now online here, audio files which include
• An introduction to Rosa Luxemburg's life and works, a talk taken from the AWL London forum on 18 January 2019.
• An introduction to 'The Mass Strike, the Political Party and the Trade Unions', published in 1906.
• Workers' Liberty's pamphlet 'The German Revolution, selected writings of Rosa Luxemburg'. The pamphlet can also be purchased here.

Rosa Luxemburg and imperialism

Submitted by AWL on Wed, 23/01/2019 - 10:46
Luxemburg speaks

Rosa Luxemburg considered her most important contribution to be her book, The Accumulation of Capital, published in 1913.

The legacy of the Polish­-German revolutionary socialist leader who was murdered by a right­-wing militia operating under the aegis of a Social­ Democratic government just over 100 years ago has come down to us through a haze of sentimental misrepresentation and selective republishing, but now can and should be reconsidered.

Reading about Rosa Luxemburg

Submitted by AWL on Wed, 16/01/2019 - 12:33
RL reading

As we go to press on 15 January 2019, it is exactly the 100th anniversary of the murder of the Polish¬German revolutionary socialist Rosa Luxemburg. She was killed by a right-wing militia operating under the Social¬Democratic government which was heading off the German workers’ revolution.

We have a pamphlet in production on Luxemburg and the German revolution. Readers can also find a good summary of Luxemburg’s political work in two articles, from 1935 and 1938, by Max Shachtman.

In defence of Ernest Erber

Submitted by AWL on Wed, 05/12/2018 - 10:35
lenin

Russia was ruled by 130,000 landowners. They ruled by means of constant force over 150 million people … And yet we are told that Russia will not be able to be governed by 240,000 members of the Bolshevik Party – governing in the interests of the poor and against the rich. – V.I. Lenin, Will the Bolsheviks Retain State Power?, 1917

Revolution in Germany, 1918

Submitted by AWL on Wed, 07/11/2018 - 10:57

In November 1918, German workers overthrew the imperial government and ended the First World War. What began as a sailors’ revolt within weeks saw workers’ councils take charge of various German cities. A social democratic government took power amidst a situation of dual power. The revolution, however, would be defeated, or at least limited to the replacement of the old monarchist government by a parliamentary democracy, and a parliamentary democracy so flawed that it would within 15 years fall to the Nazis.

Luxemburg, economics, crises, and the national question

Submitted by Ruth Cashman on Thu, 30/08/2018 - 13:09
rosa luxemburg

This article seeks to review and reflect on the two volumes of Rosa Luxemburg's Complete Works published so far.

Only a scattering - a much thicker scattering since the 1970s, but still a scattering - of Luxemburg's writings have been available in English until now.

Since the 1970s there has been a "Collected Works" in German. Even that misses out a lot. The new Complete Works, edited by Peter Hudis, will be fourteen volumes.

Badges, postcards and posters!

Submitted by Gemma_S on Tue, 14/11/2017 - 14:14
A row of badges with faces on

Workers' Liberty is producing a range of badges, postcards and posters to help our fundraising drive.

Badges

Wear your revolutionary heart on your sleeve (or jumper) with our set of five badges — Karl Marx, Frederick Engels, Leon Trotsky, Rosa Luxemburg and Eleanor Marx.

50p each when sold in person. Order a set of 5 online for £2.50 including postage.

UK orders only, for international orders please email office@workersliberty.org to work out postage costs

1917 was a revolution, not a coup

Submitted by Matthew on Wed, 04/10/2017 - 11:43

The British Trotskyist group Socialist Resistance has published a book, October 1917 — Workers in Power (Merlin 2016), which defends the key decisions of the Bolsheviks, while making some reasonable criticisms of the regime created after the civil war. The collection of essays is useful in many respects, but feels somewhat stale and has a number of notable gaps.

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