Marxism and Stalinism

The two Trotskyisms during World War 2: Workers' Liberty 3/48

Published on: Wed, 10/12/2014 - 20:15

Tracing the development of "two Trotskyisms" through from the 1940 split to the 1944 polemic between Harry Braverman and Max Shachtman.

Click here to download as pdf or read online.

The pagination in the pdf is correct, but, by a mishap, the pages of the printed version of Workers' Liberty 3/48, as a pull-out in Solidarity 347, are in the wrong order. Our apologies to readers.

Check the printed version with the pdf, or follow this guide:

Page 2 has been mistakenly swapped with page 6, and page 7 with page 11.

The printed pull-out can be navigated as follows:

1: the first page, with the

What was the Stalinist USSR? A Marxist debate

Published on: Sat, 10/02/2007 - 00:33

The main viewpoints summarised: contributions by Martin Thomas and Sean Matgamna from Workers' Liberty 16; by Martin Thomas from Workers' Liberty 43; by Tom Rigby from Workers' Liberty 45.

The USSR was not state-capitalist, by Roger Clarke (WL44)
Cliff's 'state capitalism' in perspective, by Sean Matgamna (WL 56)
The USSR and non-linear capitalism, by Martin Thomas (WL59)
Stalinism in theory and history, by Pablo Velasco
A debate between Raya Dunayevskaya and Max Shachtman, from 1947, with an introduction by Chris Ford
Review articles by Paresh Chattopadhyay and Martin Thomas on the book Class

The not-so-bad gallery: Johnson, Trump, Putin?

Published on: Wed, 09/10/2019 - 10:50
Author

Gerry Bates

The Morning Star is to Jeremy Corbyn and Seumas Milne what the picture in the attic was to Dorian Gray in the famous story.

And it is disgusting in the extreme. Take the issue for Monday 7 October. You can see from the front page that, like all of us, they loathe the tinpot Mussolini Boris Johnson.

Ah, but look. While everybody with sense is anxious that the sneaky Johnson may find some way to twist the will of Parliament and crash out of the EU in a hard Brexit, the doughty warriors of the MS give the front page to the scandal of Johnson giving his American friend small financial perks.

Odd

Lukács and “tailism”

Published on: Wed, 09/10/2019 - 09:19
Author

Martin Thomas

John Cunningham, in Solidarity 519, gives a generous assessment of my comments on Gyorgy Lukács.

I want to come back on three points.

I would guess, if only from his alignment with the reforming Nagy administration in 1956, that Lukács always had inner reservations about Stalinism.

So did many of the Bolsheviks who capitulated to Stalinism. Through most of the 1930s the exile Mensheviks and Trotskyists had sporadic contacts with people who were deeply embedded in the Stalinist machine and yet talked in confidence of their horror at Stalin’s course.

The combination is what made them — and

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