Marxism and Stalinism

The two Trotskyisms during World War 2: Workers' Liberty 3/48

Published on: Wed, 10/12/2014 - 20:15

Tracing the development of "two Trotskyisms" through from the 1940 split to the 1944 polemic between Harry Braverman and Max Shachtman.

Click here to download as pdf or read online.

The pagination in the pdf is correct, but, by a mishap, the pages of the printed version of Workers' Liberty 3/48, as a pull-out in Solidarity 347, are in the wrong order. Our apologies to readers.

Check the printed version with the pdf, or follow this guide:

Page 2 has been mistakenly swapped with page 6, and page 7 with page 11.

The printed pull-out can be navigated as follows:

1: the first page, with the

What was the Stalinist USSR? A Marxist debate

Published on: Sat, 10/02/2007 - 00:33

The main viewpoints summarised: contributions by Martin Thomas and Sean Matgamna from Workers' Liberty 16; by Martin Thomas from Workers' Liberty 43; by Tom Rigby from Workers' Liberty 45.

The USSR was not state-capitalist, by Roger Clarke (WL44)
Cliff's 'state capitalism' in perspective, by Sean Matgamna (WL 56)
The USSR and non-linear capitalism, by Martin Thomas (WL59)
Stalinism in theory and history, by Pablo Velasco
A debate between Raya Dunayevskaya and Max Shachtman, from 1947, with an introduction by Chris Ford
Review articles by Paresh Chattopadhyay and Martin Thomas on the book Class

The story of the Polish workers

Published on: Wed, 04/03/2020 - 10:30
Author

Eduardo Tovar

This year marks the fortieth anniversary of the founding of Solidarność (Solidarity), the Polish independent trade union, at what was then the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk. Solidarność both emerged from and provided the organisational infrastructure for the mass strikes of August 1980.

This intense period of struggle thrust strike leaders like Lech Wałęsa and Anna Walentynowicz into the international limelight. With the signing of the Gdańsk Agreement on 31 August 1980, Solidarność became the first independent union to be recognised by a Warsaw Pact country.

At its height in September 1981,

Mr Jones and Stalinism

Published on: Wed, 26/02/2020 - 09:06
Author

Justine Canady

Agnieska Holland’s Mr. Jones is a film with a clear political message: the crimes of Stalinism must not be neglected and forgotten.

It’s based on a real story. Welsh journalist Gareth Jones travels to the Soviet Union in the early 1930s to investigate the success of Stalin’s five-year plan. Instead, he uncovers a mass operation of fake news generated by journalists and finds his way to Ukraine, to be witness to the man-made famine of Holodomor, which killed millions.

The film is heavy on contrasts between prosperity and hellish destitution. Upon his arrival in Moscow, Jones meets Pulitzer

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